Countdown To Nano…

With three days, and counting, until NaNoWriMo kicks off it’s time for all of us lollygaggers to get our collective act together. Whether you have a few things left to nail down, or you’re entirely unprepared – do not stress!

I’ve got your back, guys, and together we can get off to a flying start this NaNoWriMo. So, what should you be doing? Well, that depends on who you are!

 

The Newbie

Bless your heart – you’re excited, you’re full of enthusiasm… you have no idea what’s coming your way. If this is your very first NaNoWriMo, welcome! Whether you know what you want to write or not there are a few things you should do to make sure that your first NaNo is everything you want it to be;

1) Make A NaNoWriMo Account; 

This one may be obvious, but make an account, enter the details of your novel, no matter how basic, and get yourself all set up before November 1st.

2) Gather Your People

If you have writing friends who are participating add them to your profile so you can encourage and track each other. Alternatively join a writing group on Facebook/Twitter/Tumblr and find people who you can talk with about the stresses and joys of this writerly season.

3) Pick An Idea

The most common thing I hear people say when they are new to NaNo is that they have “so many” ideas; these people inevitably become conflicted about whether they’re following the right one! Develop your ideas and then pick the one that takes your fancy most. Remember you’re not abandoning all the others for good; you’re picking which one you want to work on first.

4) Set Reasonable Goals

If you’ve never participated in something like this before it’s normal to expect that you’ll be able to keep up a break-neck pace all month. You won’t; this is a marathon, not a sprint and so consistency and endurance are key. Set a low goal which you are confident you could meet on a bad day; if you exceed it you’ll feel great. If you set a goal which requires too much from you every single day you’ll fall behind and become demotivated!

 

The Last Minute Entrant

Image result for kylo ren slide gif

So, you’ve skidded onto the scene with less than a week to go – you know the ropes, you’ve done it before… you just didn’t think you were going to do it this year. Alas the pull of NaNo was too strong, and now you’re scrambling to get ready.

So, what can you do?

1) Plot Some Shit

Look, I know you have nine billion ideas floating around; pick one, develop it, and create a loose structure. You’ve done this before – pick a genre and get ready to pants this shit.

2) Prepare Your Work Space

If you’re not as prepared as you would like, sorting out your work space is key; set up your writing station in a place you know will be relaxed and relatively undisturbed so that you can focus while you work.

You could even stash some treats and supplies nearby. Think cans of energy juice, your coffee maker, a blanket, some protein bars, or, hell, even a scented candle. Whatever you need to keep your arse in that seat while you write.

3) Inform Your Friends And Family

You know, so they don’t worry when you drop off the face of the earth for a month.

 

Perpetually Prepared Plotter

Piss off, you don’t need my help;

Go have a drink and be awesome until it all kicks off.

 

Everyone!

  • Create your ultimate writing playlist
  • Organise your notes
  • Treat Yo Self (*read: get yourself something nice to alleviate the stress*)
  • Look out your dictionary and thesaurus

 

And, finally, enjoy it!

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Building The Writing “Habit” (October #Authortoolboxbloghop)

This post was written for the Author Toolbox monthly Blog Hop – if you want to sign up you can do so right here!

One thing I always hear other writers complain about is the fact that they say they “can’t” write at a certain time; they lack motivation, they lack inspiration, they lack the right environment. While its true that all of these things can cause you to slow down and become stuck in a rut, I really don’t believe the should cause you to come to a complete halt.

There are some things we can do in order to minimise the effect of these various lacks and issues. The most effective, in my experience, is to get into the habit of writing regularly when you’re riding high on motivation, inspiration, and free time; while forming a habit might not help you to avoid losing motivation or hitting a writing wall, but it will enable you to begin pushing through such times in your writing career.

 

The Writing Habit

Habit – a recurrent, often unconscious, pattern of behaviour which is acquired through frequent repetition. 

There is a common myth that it takes 21 days to form a new habit, for example drinking a glass of water every morning when you wake up, but this, as it turns out, is very much not true.

According to various studies (one summed up succinctly in this site) learning a new habit can take a minimum of 21 days with many people taking closer to 3 months to form a concrete habit. This might sound less than comforting, but don’t stress too much; studies also show that if you miss a day here and there it won’t ruin everything. As long as you get right back on the horse you will be able to form the habit without having to restart the process all over again.

 

Laying The Foundation

So, while you’ll need longer to build the habit of writing than you may have anticipated the first two weeks can easily be classed as critical; these are the foundation for going forward.

If you want to give yourself the best chance of laying a strong foundation you need to be consistent and reasonable in your goals. Trying to write five thousand words each and every day will most likely be unattainable unless you have the time and means to make writing a full-time job. Try to set a routine that is:

  • Manageable
  • Reasonable
  • Intuitive

If you are a night owl, for example, and try to force yourself to get up early to write you’ll find that you become exhausted and fed up very quickly. When trying to build a new habit do so one at a time. At first, work with your body and mind in ways that they are used to.

For example, set yourself the goal of writing a single page first thing in the morning or last thing at night for the first two weeks. For the first two weeks do this every single day, including weekends.

 

Capitalising On It

Once the first two weeks are over you should begin to work into the grooves you have already laid out for yourself, so to speak. At this point, you should start treating your writing habit like a day job; five on, two off.

I can hear you screeching to a half – “what? Deliberately skip days?” I hear you ask… well, no, because you’re not skipping days as much as you are building a working routine that allows for decompression. The best way to fail to build a habit, or to build a habit that breaks you down, is to set a routine that does not allow for rest and recuperation.

When you’re hitting your single page goal each working day you can begin to up your quota; try going for a page and a half for a week, and then two pages per day for a week. Adjust your daily goal until you find a level that is engaging, but comfortable. This will depend on your personal situation; if you’re writing full time this could be three or four pages per day or more. If you have only an hour or two a day jump back down to one page.

The key is consistency.

 

Moving Forward

Once you have a good habit behind you, you can start to think about technique and style. Considering how to world build, how to develop ideas, and how to build characters.

The important thing is that you first get into a habit of consistent productivity and that you allow for your own nature; you will miss your goal now and then, but that should never dissuade you from trying the next day.